Why They March

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Why They March

Maddie Turco, Writer

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Why do we need a Women’s March or, for that matter, a Women’s Rights Movement? After all, in the United States, women can vote, hold a job, make money, own property, be in the military, and make decisions for themselves. First, it is important to go into why the Women’s Rights Movement started, specifically the fourth wave, which began in 2012. The previous waves of feminism included Women’s Suffrage, reproductive rights, and the appropriation of derogatory terms. The most recent wave is focused on endeavors to recognize the needs of all races and all classes of women.

Fourth wave feminism was started to bring attention to harmful stereotypes, end violence against women and promote equal pay. Feminism targets stereotypes about the presence of women in society based on irrelevant standards. It is estimated that over 65% of women have experienced some sort of harassment in their lifetime, but this is likely under-reported. The most recent demonstration of this is the “#MeToo” movement, started by Alyssa Milano, and carried on by women all over the world. This movement is to demonstrate the magnitude of sexual violence within the United States. In addition, white women are paid 80 cents to a man’s dollar, and colored women, even less. While there are a number of legislative efforts in place to help mitigate the pay discrepancies between males and females, up to this point, while they have helped, they have not yet solved the problem. The United Nations Women’s program released the statistics of where each country ranks in female governmental participation. The United States is ranked number 104 out of 193 behind Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Mexico, and Nicaragua, just to name a few. All of these issues are part of the fundamentals of the Women’s March. The 2018 Women’s March, with 2.5 million attendees, 10,000 of them in Raleigh, fought to get people registered to vote in the 2018 midterms, end the government funding cuts to reproductive health centers, and stop the demeaning rhetoric about women used in society.

As with any protest, it seems they march because they are not happy with the way they are being treated. They know that our country has much more potential than where it is now, and they believe that their efforts will make a difference.

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